Carnival of Space #114

The Carnival of Space is coordinated by Fraser Cain of Astronomy Cast and Universe Today fame. Every week, a different webmaster or blogger hosts the carnival, showcasing articles written on the topic of space. If you'd like to be a host for the carnival, please drop Fraser an email at info@universetoday.com.

 

So welcome to the third cheapest carnival on Earth (after CoS #85 and #97)!

 

 

Community outreach

Simostronomy offers some practical advice on community outreach activities, including telescope parties. Importantly, if you have a goto telescope it’s a good idea to yell ‘duck’.

 

Bringing us back to Earth

Starts With A Bang discusses the real doomsday scenario of 2012—when the ongoing rise in CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere starts going critical. Don’t worry though—it’s years away.

 

The big and the small of it

The Angry Astronomer gets hot under the collar about solar oscillations in some red giants in NGC 6397. Then he rants about a paper proposing a new scenario for the Haumea collisional family. Haumea is that dwarf planet which has apparently achieved hydrostatic equilibrium despite looking like an egg. It’s infuriating.

 

Not moving on

Astroengine warns that the IAU might once again decide to reclassify Pluto—as if we hadn’t all got the idea that it’s a just a dwarf planet plutoid/KBO thingy. Guys, let it go...

 

Ten years of Xrays

Chandra Blog celebrates the first ten years of discovery by the Chandra Space Telescope. For example, it’s found that some greedy galaxies have two super-massive black holes at their centre.

 

Be smarter than you know how

Weird Warp offers to plug your brain into the next generation of computers so you can think about really intelligent things in an event-horizon-esque kind of way (just in case you didn’t get the astronomy link).

 

Saturn anomaly

Stochastic Scribbles reports on a discrepancy between Voyager and Cassini data about Saturn’s rotation—where Cassini measures it at about seven minutes longer than Voyager. The discrepancy is likely to be methodological rather than real—one suspects Cassini can run rings around Voyager, can’t it?

 

Apollo might-have-beens

As we recover from the 40th anniversary of the first Moon landing, Beyond Apollo offers a hair of the dog in the form of the Common Space Fleet plan documented in 1968 and Robot Explorers speculates on how the NASA of the late 1960’s might have dealt with an 18th month warning that asteroid Icarus was on a collision course with Earth.

 

Apollo - The next generation

A Babe in the Universe relates two events at NASA Ames last week. A rare appearance of the Apollo 11 crew—and the announcement of a new team of teachers in space.

 

Unlikely scenario

The Dynamics of Cats provides a skeptical review of a recent critique of WMAPs findings on some major chunks of modern cosmology. They may be confusing their octopoles with their monopoles.

 

Bad for the eyes

Bad Astronomy showcases a new 3D image from the HiRISE camera aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter—although I couldn’t find the link to download the red and green glasses you’ll need to really see it.

 

Space tech

Nextbigfuture looks at some next big things, including the space elevator games (kind of like the Olympics—except up) and new developments in carbon nanotube technology required to build the things.

 

Great lake stows away on Space Shuttle

CollectSpace reports that before undocking from the International Space Station, the STS-127 crew on space shuttle Endeavour transferred an estimated 1,200 pounds of water to the outpost. One crew member however kept stowed a small, but very special set of water samples.

 

Travel pics

Universe Today offers some great snaps of the STS-127 mission.

 

Galileo wannabes

Lounge of the Lab Lemming develops a crackpot theory about crackpot theorists.

 

Galactic life in context

Centauri Dreams gives us reasons for optimism about the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence in a galaxy that may possess its own kind of habitable zones. Just avoid all that clumpy cold dark matter—ugh.

 

Getting out of low Earth orbit

Martian Chronicles ponders three days of public meetings of the NASA Human Spaceflight Review. The meetings achieve consensus that we have to go somewhere.

 

A sense of place

TheSpaceWriter offers musings on how our future homes in space may change us before we change them. If you like this idea, I strongly recommend you read Brian Stableford’s Daedalus Mission books.

 

Long day’s journey into night

Astropixie went to China last week to see the total solar eclipse. There’s a video—and also an out-takes reel about the whole experience.

 

Always bring the weather with you

Astroblogger reports on some new weather forecasting services for Australian astronomers, including the appropriately named SkippySky.

 

Are we there yet?

Cumbrian Sky ponders some might-have-beens with a reflection on the fact that we still haven’t landed on Mars.

 

In space no-one can hear you podcast

Cheap Astronomy completes a busy July recording schedule (just saying that because it sounds cool) with an IYA 365 Days of Astronomy podcast and a long overdue tribute to one of the world’s best known cheap astronomers, John Dobson.

 

 

Well, that’s it. It’s been a privilege to host yet another Carnival of Space for 2009 The International Year of Astronomy!

The universe is yours to discover—and it won’t cost you the Earth.

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Ask us a question: cheapastro@gmail.com | Home | About us

Home

Naked eye astronomy

Fun with binoculars

Cheap telescopes

Too cold outside

Cheap cosmology

Reader contributions

Cheap podcasts

What's up with Chris

Send an email

About us

Explore the universe on a shoestring

Cheap Astronomy