Carnival of Space #97

The Carnival of Space is coordinated by Fraser Cain of Astronomy Cast and Universe Today fame. Every week, a different webmaster or blogger hosts the carnival, showcasing articles written on the topic of space. If you'd like to be a host for the carnival, please drop Fraser an email at info@universetoday.com.

 

So welcome to the second cheapest carnival on Earth (after CoS #85)!

 

 

Back to the sixties

Beyond Apollo has a flashback to 1966, with Manned Mars Surface Operations, a plan of what a mission to Mars should include. It’s groovy.

 

Back on line

Tomorrow is Here seeks help with the Mars Express ‘webcam’. If you are looking to make a contribution to planetary science—or to start new Face on Mars conspiracy theory—it’s worth checking out.

 

More Mars postcards

Cumbrian Sky investigates HiRISE images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and finds clear tracks of Bigfoot on Mars, but tries to pass them off as the aftermath of a Martian avalanche.

 

Mars Q&A

Alice's AstroInfo explores the potential for Martian tourism, including its minimal light pollution which is sure to be a big draw card for touring astronomers.

 

Hold the front page

Next Big Future finds evidence of water on Mars again—but adds some interesting speculation of past ‘tropical’ glaciers due to axial tilt changes.

 

Dark skepticism

A Babe in the Universe explores alternative views on dark energy, an idea only eleven years old that is based on the observations of distant supernovae. Could it be much ado about nothing?

 

Water world

The Meridiani Journal has the latest on subsurface water on Titan which produces cryovolcanoes and the inevitable speculation that there might be little swimmy things there.

 

A star is reborn

Orbital Hub reports on the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is a high-energy X-ray space telescope that will expand our understanding of the origins and the development of stars and galaxies. NASA initially cancelled the program due to budgetary constraints but, in September 2007, decided the acronym was too good to let go.

 

Skeleton in the closet module

21st Century Waves reveals the shocking truth behind the father of the International Space Station (if finding out that it’s Ronald Reagan isn’t shocking enough).

 

Party like it’s 2009

Astroblog passes on some important lessons about footpath astronomy from its Earth Hour Star Party.

 

Meet the press

Simostronomy interviews Martin Ratcliffe of Astronomy magazine, who turns out to have done a lot of astronomy in his life (so it’s lucky he writes for the magazine).

 

Around the world in 80 telescopes

Chandra Blog announces its live webcast from the control centre of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the space telescope.

 

Space junket

Over at Out of the Cradle, Ken the Lunar Librarian gives a travelogue of his visit to the 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, including a few side trips around Houston to buy books.

 

Not as bad as it looks

Bad Astronomy gives us a virtual 3d close-up view of the mass-extinction-sized Near Earth Object 1996 HW1.

 

Hearing is believing

Astroengine outlines a new technique to listen out for habitable exoplanets.

 

Hubble’s still got it

Starts with a Bang finds that the Hubble Space Telescope also has some clever exoplanet-finding tricks.

 

Storm warning

The Planetary Society blog describes some action packed weather on Mars.

 

Baby photo

Lounge of the Lab Lemming investigates a southern solar nebula with remarkable chemical similarities to the gas cloud that collapsed down to form our solar system about 5 billion years ago—and there’s water, so little swimmy things are to be expected.

 

Kitchen science

Centauri Dreams looks at a high speed solar sail that will coast on a microwave and could get to Pluto in half the time it will take the New Horizons spacecraft.

 

Dead stick landings

Music of the Spheres tries to land the Atlantis space shuttle orbiter at Space Expo 2009 with some difficulty.

 

Chicks in space

Cheap Astronomy delivers the 3 April 2009 edition of the IYA 365 Days of Astronomy podcast investigating the glass ceiling that is low Earth orbit.

 

Well, that’s it. It’s been a privilege to host yet another Carnival of Space for 2009 The International Year of Astronomy!

The universe is yours to discover—and you don’t have to break the bank doing it.

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Home

Naked eye astronomy

Fun with binoculars

Cheap telescopes

Too cold outside

Cheap cosmology

Reader contributions

Cheap podcasts

What's up with Vernon

Send an email

About us

Explore the universe on a shoestring

Cheap Astronomy